The hardest to learn was the least complicated

It’s Labor Day, a holiday which honors American workers and symbolizes the end of summer. Tomorrow, my son will start 4K, and this will be his first go-round with attending school five mornings a week. When he met his teacher last week he said, “My name is Dillon. D-i-l-l-o-n.”

Yes, I’m pretty sure he’s ready. Watching him embrace the change makes it easier to let him go. I’m excited about all he’ll learn this year, and I marvel at what he already knows. Kids are pretty amazing like that.

What I enjoy most about being a parent is what my children teach me. Scrolling through Facebook this weekend, I saw this photo in my news feed, posted by my husband:

Dillon and Blake porch pool


The caption read: “Big Day at the Country Club.” It’s obvious our boys aren’t at a country club. They’re whooping it up in a plastic swimming pool on our front porch. But they don’t seem to mind, or even notice, the difference.

Children don’t know much, if anything, about the concept of the American Dream. They don’t understand how their parents work to help them have a “better life.” And when I look at this photo, I ask myself, “Better than what?” This looks like a pretty good life, to me.

The most important thing my children have taught me is how to be happy, no matter the circumstances, no matter where I am or what material things I possess. Children have it figured out.

Kids don’t need a holiday to celebrate. They’ll beat the drum any day of the week. As my sons grow up and forge their own dreams for a “better life,” I hope I can return the favor and pass the lesson back to them. As they venture out into the world in search of happiness and opportunity, I’ll show them this picture and tell them they have everything they need to succeed in this world.

I’ll remind them that even at this young age, they were already so, so wise.